Public Speaking Skill: Give Presentations and Grow Your Consulting or Other Business

by Allan Kaufman

How would you like to develop additional income streams and grow your business by 10%, 20%, 30%, or more?

In your consulting practice or other business, you have acquired years of experience, knowledge and expertise. Capitalize on this knowledge base and increase your income by delivering presentations and seminars and writing informational reports on your area of expertise.

For example, Gary has over 25 years experience in the painting and home improvement fields, and he is very good at it. He probably could double his income by sharing his knowledge and experiences with others.

He could become a painting consultant. He could speak at various venues and sell time-saving, home-improvement tip sheets that he would create.

As an expert, you could give presentations at various local organizations for a fee or for free. For example, if you are a financial planner, you could create a short presentation on “The Ten Biggest Financial Management Mistakes People Make and How to Avoid Them!” You could create and sell, or give away, a special report on the same topic.

By sharing your ideas in presentations, you establish credibility and develop a reputation as a leader in your industry. You acquire new clients, get additional referrals and sell your knowledge.

This idea could work for you whether you are a dentist, lawyer, chiropractor, financial planner, management consultant, or interior designer.

Giving presentations in front of potential customers is your ticket for increasing your business and expanding it.

Hundreds of organizations are looking for speakers. Some may even pay you. There are charitable organizations, homeowner associations, alumni groups, work groups, religious organizations, brotherhoods and sisterhoods, industry organizations, etc.

These groups meet locally, regionally and some nationally. Let them know you are available to speak, and your business will grow.

To do this, you will want to reduce or get rid of your performance anxiety, stage fright and public speaking fear, and develop effective communication skills. Also, learn how to…

  • Organize your presentations so audiences understand your message.
  • Make engaging eye contact to connect with your audiences.
  • Use gestures and movements to add impact to your messages.
  • Use humor to spice-up your presentations.
  • Use visual aids to help drive home your ideas.
  • Recognize the importance of involving your audiences.

So develop presentations and create informational reports on your area of expertise. Market them to organizations. In time, you will develop additional income streams and your consulting or other business will grow.

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©Allan Misch and Allan Kaufman, 2004-2013. All rights reserved. The copyright holders give permission to reproduce this article; disseminate it; publish it in print, electronic form and on a website as long as it is not edited and carries the byline and contact information.

Allan and Allan help business professionals reduce or eliminate public speaking fear, performance anxiety, stage fright, and other performance blocks rapidly and enhance presentation skills. They offer 4 valuable, complimentary videos on “10 Critical Strategies to Make Your Presentation Slides More Memorable” and public speaking tips in their complimentary No Sweat Speaking™ newsletter. Get it at http://www.nosweatspeaking.com.

More in this section: Public Speaking Skill: How to Give a Team Presentation | Public Speaking Skill: How to Grab Your Audience by Their Corpuscles and Wake Them Up! | Public Speaking Skill: How to Stimulate and Captivate Your Audience with PowerPoint! | Public Speaking Skill: Use Empowering Words and Get Powerful Results! | Public Speaking Skill: Walk Before You Run—First Eliminate Public Speaking Fear and Build Confidence, Then Build Skill

“10 Critical Strategies to Make Your Presentation Slides More Memorable”

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